Tackling Hepatitis and Other Blood-borne Viruses in Prisons

The prevalence of hepatitis C and  hepatitis B in Australian prisons is higher than in in the wider community, but prison settings also present and opportunity for testing, monitoring and treatment, especially for hepatitis C since the introduction of new, highly effective drugs that has shortened treatment time dramatically.

Up to 40 per cent of prisoners have hepatitis C, compared to only one per cent in the wider community, and three to four per cent of prisoners have hepatitis B, compared to just under one per cent in the wider South Australian community.

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Eating Low Sodium Part One – the No Added Salt Diet

In this series on low salt eating for people with liver disease we will be looking at how to modify your diet to stay within the recommended daily sodium intake of 2,300mg per day. This daily limit is for those people who need to control fluid retention and is significantly higher than that recommended for people who need to control high blood pressure. Be sure to check with your doctor which limit is right for you.

Part One will cover the No Added Salt diet recommended by GESA  and many other medical associations around the world.

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Handy Tool Simplifies Management of Hepatitis C Treatment

One of the key planks of Australia’s hepatitis C elimination strategy is increasing treatment through management by General Practitioners (GPs), making it easier for individuals to receive treatment and facilitating access to hard-to-reach communities.

GP training programs have been rolled out across the country and GP prescribing had increased from 8 per cent in March to 31 per cent in December. However, most prescribing (62 per cent) are still by specialists and GP prescriptions in South Australia, Northern Territory, ACT and Victoria are significantly below average.

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World Hepatitis Day – a few things to think about during morning tea…

In the ten minutes it took you to brew your morning cuppa and dunk your favourite bikkie, 25 people died. They were killed by viral hepatitis – part of the 152 people around the world, who die every hour from this treatable, preventable disease.

Locally, about 24 Australians die each week from hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Not as shocking as 25 in 10 minutes but that’s still 1,237 needless Australian deaths each year.

World Hepatitis Day (28 July) is a reminder that Australians cannot afford to rest on our laurels. Although 14 per cent of Australians with hepatitis C have been cured, there are still many, many who need to receive treatment.

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Eat Well to Feel Well – Convenience Food or Convenient Food?

If you have viral hepatitis eating well can make a real difference to your quality of life but consistently eating fresh, healthy food most of the time can be a lot of effort. Most of us struggle to meet the Australian Dietary Guidelines  by eating plenty of fruits and vegetables and limiting the amount of convenience foods in our diet. However, with a little thought, planning and effort you can make cooking more convenient and eating the way you want to a lot more achievable.

Although cooking is often presented as a pleasurable activity that we all enjoy and naturally know how to do this isn’t the case for many people. At the end of a long day cooking can be a real chore. Surprisingly, recognising this can be the key to eating better more often.

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Many Ways for South Australians to Get Hepatitis Information

South Australians are now getting viral hepatitis information in more ways than ever before.

In 2015-16 Hepatitis SA received orders from individuals for over 14,100 items of printed information; its website had over 29,380 page views.

In 2005, the organisation’s online presence was one small static website and information was disseminated mainly in printed form. Today Hepatitis SA has a two Twitter accounts, three Facebook pages, an online hepatitis C self-assessment tool, a WeChat account, and an AdelaideBBS account, all backed up by a dynamic website with regularly updated articles. This is an indication of the way health information provision has changed in the last decade.

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